The National Glass Collectors Fair

Heading: National Glass Collectors Fair

In Focus: 6 May 2018

Whilst updating the Preview Gallery for our May 2018 National Glass Fair we chose to highlight a few significant pieces of glass that were offered for sale on the day of the fair.


18th Century Royal Goblet

18th Century Royal Goblet by Borgloh
18th Century Royal Goblet by Borgloh

This Rare & important 18th century Royal goblet features the arms & war pennants of Ernest Augustus, Duke of York and Albany. Ernest Augustus was the younger brother of George I & he was responsible for the foundation of the Borgloh glass house at Osnabruck Germany. The factory was established "to utilize surplus coal from his mines" and manufacturing commenced in 1726.

This goblet conforms exactly to documented examples from Borgloh, especially the unusual stem formation. However this example is full lead crystal and Borgloh was no known to produce lead glass.

Due to family connections it is not inconceivable that some examples of Borgloh glass found their way into the royal households of England. It may therefore be possible for this to be a period reproduction that was made to order by an English glass works (as either a replacement for a damaged item or to supplement a household's suite of glassware).

The cover to this goblet is thought to be from the same period, but it was common during this time for a marriage to occur. It was the norm for a goblet finial of this period to mirror the stem formation, so if it is a marriage it has been a long and happy one.

Provenance: Sotheby's "Property from the Royal House of Hanover" 2005,
lot 996, engraving attributed to G. E. Kunckel.

C. 1726/30

Height:33cm

This item was offered for sale by Peter Adamson on Stand No. 37 - Hall 2.

Visit the 18th Century gallery to view more examples of glassware from this period.

 


The Ginger Jar by Steven Piper

The Ginger Jar by contemporary glass artist Steven Piper
The Ginger Jar by contemporary glass artist Steven Piper.
Image courtesy of Stephen J. Bennett Photography.

This engraved ginger jar was a commission for the glass artist Allister Malcolm and was inspired by a cameo glass design produced by George Woodall (Loves Awakening).

The jar is green cased over clear and stands at 30cm tall. The cartouches are engraved with a Gold Finch, Long tailed Tit and a Wren.

Steven Piper is an experienced traditional copper wheel glass engraver. He was trained by Kevin Andrews at Webb Corbett and has spent his lifetime working with glass. After working for over a decade at Webb Corbett (later Royal Doulten) Steven set up his own workshop and began producing his creations as a freelance glass engraver.

Over the years Steven has completed many commissions, antique restorations and works of his own design. His love and knowledge for traditional engraving shines through in his designs, which are now available for all to see via his new website www.sjpiper.com.

Visit the Contemporary Glass Gallery to view more examples of work by Steven Piper, as well as glassware by other contemporary glass artists.

 

 


Pâte de Verre Vase By Argy Rousseau

Pâte de Verre Vase By Argy Rousseau
Pâte de Verre Vase By Argy Rousseau

This Soucis vase dates to around 1920 and is a fine example of the pâte de verre glassware produced by Argy Rousseau.

The manufacturing process for pate de verre begins with the creation of a paste made from combining finely crushed glass and colourants with a binding material (such as gum arabic mixed with water). The glass paste is then painted onto the inner surface of a negative mould. Variation in colour were achieved by painting different areas of the mould with differently coloured pastes. Once the paste had been built up to the desired thickness the mould would have been slowly fired over several hours, fusing the glass together into a solid sculptural form.

This item was offered for sale by Shane Theophilus on Stand No. 08 - Hall 1.

Visit the 19th & 20th century glass gallery to view more examples of glass from this period that will be available to buy at our next glass fair.